January Juice – Blood Orange, Beetroot and Carrot

It is January and I feel that I would not have fulfilled my duty if I did not include one super-healthy, new-start, loose-weight, change-your-life sort of recipe and here it is. Blood oranges are so pretty and sweet and the colour is amazing. The distinctive dark flesh colour is due to the presence of anthocyanins, an excellent antioxidant which makes these oranges higher in anti-oxidant content than regular ones. Along with the blood-purifying beetroot and carotene packed carrots and a triple high-vitamin-C hit, this delicious juice cannot fail to put you on the right path to a new you!

But why just give up after January. My new years resolution is to do a new seasonal juice every month. Look out for February’s!

January Juice

Makes one large glass

4 blood oranges

1 beetroot

2 carrots

Scrub the beetroot and the carrots. Juice the carrots and the beetroot with a juice extractor. Juice the blood oranges with a citrus press attachment. Mix together well and drink.

Top tip: Keep your fruit and veg in the fridge before hand so that your drink is nicely chilled. The quicker you use it the better it is for you.

Bagna Caulda with Winter Vegetables

This is a really delicious way of using up all sorts of winter vegetables. You can even use lightly blanched vegetables such as bitter greens but I like it most with a huge selection of raw winter veg. Bagna Caulda, literally meaning “hot bath”, is a warm garlic and anchovy mayonnaise which you dip your vegetables into, a bit like a fondue. Originally from Piedmont in Italy, it is traditionally eaten at Christmas and New Year. I real Winter salad!

 

Winter Vegetables

Really the veg is up to you but I used a combination of

a few young carrots , peeled and finely sliced

sweet baby peppers

a few small raw beetroots , peeled and finely sliced

a few sticks celery , trimmed and thinly sliced, yellow leaves reserved

½ small Romanesco or white cauliflower , broken into florets

1 bulb fennel , trimmed and finely sliced, herby tops reserved

1 bunch radishes , trimmed and washed

½ celeriac , peeled and finely sliced

 

Bagna Cauda

6 cloves garlic, peeled

300 ml milk

10 anchovy fillets in oil

180 ml extra virgin olive oil , plus extra for drizzling

2-3 tablespoons white wine vinegar

To make your sauce, put the garlic cloves, milk and anchovies into a saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer slowly for 10 minutes, or until the garlic is soft and tender, keeping a close eye on the pan to make sure the milk doesn’t boil over. Don’t worry if it spits and looks a little lumpy – simply remove from the heat and whiz the sauce up with a hand blender. Gently blend in the extra virgin olive oil and the vinegar a little at a time – you’re in control of the consistency at this point. If you like it thick, like mayonnaise, keep blending. Now taste it and adjust the seasoning. Make sure there’s enough acidity from the vinegar to act like a dressing. It should be an incredible, pungent warm sauce.

There are two ways you can serve this – with both you need the sauce to be warm. Either pour the sauce into a bowl and place this on a plate, with the veg arranged around the bowl, or serve the veg in a big bowl and drizzle the sauce over the top. Sprinkle over the reserved herby fennel tops and celery leaves and finish with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

Golden Beetroot, Fresh Goat’s Cheese, Baby Spinach and Toasted Walnut Salad

When I went to work in California back in the 90’s it was a revelation of the importance of ingredients. This concept, of not merely buying but “sourcing” was only just beginning in London at the time, but in California everything was obtained from specialist suppliers.

What a long way we have come with every menu in town listing artisanal this and rare breed that. Anyway, one of the ingredients I was most excited about seeing all those years ago was all the different varieties of beetroots in the farmers market.  Deep golden yellow, creamy white, deep purple and even pink and white striped. So it brought back memories when I saw that Riverford where now growing bunched golden beetroot and this recipe is in honour of them.

Golden Beetroot, Fresh Goat’s Cheese, Baby Spinach and Toasted Walnut Salad

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1/3 cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

A couple of handfuls (about 70g) baby spinach leaves

450g beetroot, any colour, roasted, peeled and cut into wedges

150g soft goat’s cheese, crumbled

75g toasted walnuts

To roast beetroot, scrub and wrap individually in tinfoil. Roast in the oven at 180C for about 45 minutes until a skewer inserts easily. Leave wrapped up until cool. Unwrap and slip off the skins with your hands.

Whisk the lemon juice, olive oil and Dijon mustard together in a small bowl. Season to taste with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Place the spinach in a bowl. Add half the dressing to the spinach mixture and toss well. Divide among 4 serving plates (or leave in the large bowl if desired), then scatter with beetroot, goat’s cheese and toasted walnuts. Drizzle with the remaining dressing and serve immediately.

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Beetroot, Lentil, Halloumi and Parsley Salad

This is a salad my brother made a few weeks ago for lunch and I had been meaning to get round to sharing it with you. It is very good. Halloumi, beetroot lentils and parsley  is a particularly good combination and with the lightly pickled onion and the zestyness of the lemon it becomes something quite special.

Beetroot, Lentil, Halloumi and Parsley Salad

200g Puy lentils

2 lemons

1 red onion, finely sliced

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

400g can chickpeas, drained and rinsed

250g beetroot, roast, peeled and chopped into chunks

1 bunch parsley, roughly chopped

250g pack halloumi, cut into 8 slices

To roast beetroot, scrub and wrap individually in tinfoil. Roast in the oven at 180C for about 45 minutes until a skewer inserts easily. Leave wrapped up until cool. Unwrap and slip off the skins with your hands.

Cook the lentils in a pan of boiling water for 20-25 mins or until just done. Meanwhile, squeeze the juice from one lemon into a bowl. Add the onion and scrunch together with a pinch of salt to pickle slightly. Set aside.

Finely zest the remaining lemon and set aside for the halloumi. Squeeze the juice from half of it into a jam jar or jug. Add the oil with a pinch of salt and freshly ground black pepper– shake well and set aside. When the lentils are ready, drain and tip into a large serving bowl with the chickpeas. Toss with the dressing straight away, then toss through the beets, parsley and drained pickled onions.

Heat a frying pan over a medium heat and fry the halloumi for 1-2 mins each side or until golden brown. Toss with the lemon zest, then place on top of your salad to serve.

Beetroot Waldorf Salad

I got a juicing box this week but funnily enough it wasn’t a juice which first sprang to mind – it was a salad. A good old fashioned Waldolf Salad. Created at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in 1896 not by a chef but by the maître d’hôtel Oscar Tschirky, the Waldorf salad was an instant success and famously features in Fawlty Towers!

The original version of this salad contained only apples, celery and mayonnaise but beyond that no one seems to be able to agree. Some add lettuce, grapes or raisins, often walnuts and most recently the mayonnaise has sometimes been replaced with more healthy alternatives such as yoghurt. Since there are so many variations, I thought I might add my own rather unusual ingredient of beetroot and I thought it worked very well.

Beetroot Waldorf Salad

2 apples, cored and sliced

6 sticks of celery, chopped

2 beetroot, peeled and grated

A handful of walnuts, lightly toasted in the oven

6 Tbsp mayonnaise

Juice of half a lemon

1/2 teaspoon salt

Pinch of freshly ground black pepper

Method

In a medium sized bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Stir in the apple, celery and beetroot. Scatter with walnuts.

Labneh with Roast Beetroot and Sweet and Sour Red Onions

I know this is maybe a little weird, but I recon this is honestly the nicest thing I have made in quite a while. It is strangely moreish and I polished off the whole lot whilst writing this blog.

Lebanese food has always been one on my favourites and I always order Labneh as part of the meze. But it is so easy to make your own. Buy the best yogurt that you can.

Labneh with Roast Beetroot and Sweet and Sour Red Onions

Serves 2

250 g Greek yogurt

1 kg raw beetroots

Sweet and Sour Red Onions

1 large red onion

1 tbsp. dark muscovado sugar

2 tbsp. red wine vinegar

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

a few sprigs of fresh flat-leaf parsley

Mix the Greek yogurt with a good pinch or two of salt and wrap in a clean J-cloth, fasten with string and hang it over a bowl over night to strain it. I hang it off the tap over the sink.

The next day, pre-heat oven 180C. Scrub the beetroot and wrap each one in tin foil. Put in the oven for about 45 mins to 1 hour. A skewer should insert easily into the centre of the beetroot. Leave to cool. Then make the sweet and sour onions. Peel the onion and slice as finely as you can, into rings. In a bowl, combine the sugar and ½ a teaspoon of sea salt with the vinegar, stirring until dissolved. Add the shallots and leave to stand for 45 minutes, stirring every so often. Unwrap the beetroot when cool and with your hands, slip off the skins. You can use surgical gloves if you like.

Unwrap the strained yogurt and tip it into a clean bowl. Spread over the bottom of the bowl and up the sides. Arrange slices of beetroot on top. Season lightly with a little salt and pepper. Scatter over the onions and finish with parsley and maybe a drizzle of olive oil.

Kohlrabi, Apple and Beetroot Salad

Vinegar seems to be the latest thing. Not only is it fabulous for cleaning your house, but it turns out it is fabulous for you too. Whereas white vinegar is best for your house, apple cider vinegar is the one that is best for you. New research means doctors and scientists are calling it one of the ‘functional’ foods – foods that are not only nutritious but help prevent and protect against disease.

It contains the same important nutrients as apples – including pectin, beta-carotene and potassium – plus enzymes and amino acids formed during the fermentation process.

Its high potassium content encourages cell, tissue and organism growth, and the enzymes help boost chemical reactions in the body.

It also contains calcium, which maintains healthy bones, helps transmit nerve impulses and regulates muscle contraction, and iron, essential for healthy blood. Magnesium is another component, with many beneficial effects on the body, especially the heart.

Low potassium levels can make us feel permanently tired, and potassium-rich foods help prevent age-related illness.

It also enables the stomach to produce hydrochloric acid, which aids digestion. We lose acid as we age, but apple cider vinegar can help prevent common digestive disorders as we get older.

And if that was not enough, apparently it can help with dementia as well. Is there nothing vinegar cannot do?

Here are two salads this week which feature vinegar. Oh, and lots of healthy vegetables too!

Kohlrabi, Apple and Beetroot Salad

This salad probably serves about 12 people. I halved it and still had loads!

Adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi

2 large kohlrabi

3 apples (cox is best)

2 medium beetroot

Bunch of coriander, roughly chopped, plus extra for garnish

1 garlic clove, crushed

55ml apple cider vinegar

50ml extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper

Peel the kohlrabi, cut in half and slice thinly. Core the apples and slice to the same thickness. Peel the beetroot and grate coarsely on a cheese grater or shred on a mandolin.

Mix together all the vegetables in a large bowl, then add the rest of the ingredients. Stir well, taste and season – you can afford to be generous with the salt. Pile up on a serving plate and garnish with extra chopped coriander.

Home-made V8

I have been desperate to make my own tomato juice ever since I got a juicer so I was waiting to have a glut of tomatoes. Obviously I had to wait until winter was over to have any decent tomatoes at all, but then this week I seemed to have somehow collected three punnets. So without hesitation I chucked one punnet into my juicer. Absolutely nothing came out and when I peered inside, I seemed to have made little more than some tomato froth. Turns out you really have to cook the tomatoes to get the sort of juice I had in mind. There is a raw version but it is just not the same. So you simmer your tomatoes for about 25 minutes and push them through a sieve. No juicer required. However, if like me you wanted to use your juicer, there are all sorts of favours you can add to make your tomato juice a bit different. Mine ended up tasting a bit more like V8, but I didn’t mind, because I love the stuff. I added a little beetroot, which is great as it gives it a better colour, celery, parsley, spinach, watercress and a couple of carrots. Obviously salt, onion, pepper, sugar, Worcester sauce or tabasco can help add a kick, but that is up to you.

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Smoked Salmon with Roast Beetroot and Horseradish

Next up, another recipe good enough to serve on Christmas day. A fabulous combination on Smoked Salmon, Roast Beetroot and Horseradish. Super simple and you can plate it up all beforehand. Roasting beetroot is really easy and intensifies its flavour and sweetness. It is also meant to purify your blood and help remove toxins, which is probably a good idea at Christmas time.

Smoked Salmon with Roast Beetroot and Horseradish

200ml tub crème fraiche or 200mls double cream and some lemon juice

3 tbsp hot horseradish sauce or fresh grated horseradish

1 tbsp vodka (optional)

Extra virgin olive oil

1 large beetroot

Some Salad leaves, lightly dressed with lemon and olive oil

Smoked salmon

Dill or chives

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Begin by roasting the beets. Preheat an oven to 180°C. Scrub the beets, wrap in foil, and roast for 45 to 60 minutes or until a knife inserts and removes easily. Set aside to cool. Once the beets are cool enough to handle, you can just slip the skins off with your hands. You may want to wear gloves but it is really quite a satisfying experience. Coarsely grate in a food processor or with a grater. Dress lightly with a little olive oil, salt and freshly ground black pepper. Add a little finely chopped dill or chives.

Meanwhile, fold the crème fraîche with the horseradish and vodka, if using, with a little seasoning.

Or stir a little lemon juice slowly into the double cream until it thickens. Stir in the freshly grated horseradish and season.

Before serving, arrange a layer of smoked salmon on plates. Scatter over some dressed salad leaves and top with a pile of grated beetroot. Top with sprigs of dill or chives.

Roast Beetroot and Potato Salad with Smoked Mackerel, Horseradish and Chives

Finally, for this week, beetroot is back in our boxes again. Beetroot is super good for you, as I always say, excellent at lowering blood pressure and cholesterol and especially at good at detoxing your liver, which is always a good thing. It compliments smoky fish beautifully and as I am always trying to get more omega 3 in my diet, I decided to combine it this week with some lovely smoked herring. (Heston does a rather nice “Jasmin Tea Hot Smoked” one at Waitrose.) I added some horseradish to cut the oiliness and add a kick. Served up with some mixed Riverford salad, it worked especially well with the Mizuna and Mustard Leaves. Really healthy, really delicious and really pretty too.

Roast Beetroot Salad with Smoked Mackerel, Horseradish and Chives 2

Roast Beetroot and Potato Salad with Smoked Mackerel, Horseradish and Chives

4 medium beetroot

A few cooked new potatoes (preferably still warm)

Red wine vinegar

Extra virgin olive oil

A handful of mixed salad leaves

A packet of smoked mackerel, skin and bones removed

Small bunch chives

For the horseradish Cream (or 3 tbsp. good quality creamed horseradish)

A tablespoon of fresh horseradish, peeled and grated

3 tablespoons crème fraiche (or double cream and ½ lemon)

Pinch salt

Begin by roasting the beets. Preheat an oven to 180°C. Scrub the beets, wrap in foil, and roast for 45 to 60 minutes or until a knife inserts and removes easily. Set aside to cool. Once the beets are cool enough to handle, you can just slip the skins off with your hands. You may want to wear gloves but it is really quite a satisfying experience. Cut into bite-sized chunks. Transfer to a bowl. Add your new potatoes, cut into a similar size.

Make the horseradish cream by mixing the crème fraiche with the fresh horseradish and a pinch of salt. (If using double cream, stir in slowly the juice of about half a lemon until the cream thickens.)

Add 2 tablespoons of your horseradish cream into your beetroot, along with a little vinegar, olive oil and salt and pepper to taste. Pile on top of your leaves. Roughly break up the mackerel and put on top and finally use a pair of scissors to snip chives on top.

Roast Beetroot Salad with Smoked Mackerel, Horseradish and Chives 1